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Posts tagged "Workers' Compensation"

OSHA eliminates requirement to report worker injuries

Large employers in North Carolina will no longer have to file individual incident reports for workplace accidents and injuries, according to a new action by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. OSHA announced on Jan. 24 that it was eliminating a rule created by the Obama administration for companies employing more than 250 people that mandated the filing of two electronic forms if workers were injured, made ill or killed in the workplace. Form 300 and Form 301 identified the injured workers, the type of injury involved and the effects of the injury, including missed work days or altered job duties.

Top OSHA violations of 2018 for the printing industry

Many diligent employers in North Carolina want to do what they can to create a safe, productive work environment for employees. Still, there are times when unsafe working conditions exist for one reason or another. Each year, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration spotlights the most common violations in an effort to encourage employers to take appropriate safety measures. OSHA breaks its violations down into industry segments. Below are the common issues for the printing industry.

Amazon's worker safety problem

Amazon has assumed a pervasive reach in the retail market in North Carolina and around the world. Many people place orders with Amazon because they can expect fast deliveries of the products that they want. However, the company has a history of worker safety at its distribution and transportation centers both in the U.S. and around the world.

OSHA criticized in OIG workplace safety report

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration is not doing enough to enforce regulations that require employers in North Carolina and around the county to report workplace injuries and fatalities in a timely manner. This was the conclusion reached by the Department of Labor in the Office of Inspector General's Nov. 30 report to Congress. The semiannual report marks the second time in a matter of weeks that the DOJ has criticized OSHA's less than vigorous pursuit of persistent violators.

Safety tips for outdoor winter workers

During the winter, outdoor workers in North Carolina are liable to develop hypothermia, frostbite and other conditions if they are not properly protected. They may also slip on icy and snowy surfaces, especially when removing snow off roofs, and they could get in accidents when driving. OSHA has provided some safety tips for employers on its Winter Weather resource site.

OSHA may need revised standards for robot safety

Robots are used in industries across North Carolina to take on hazardous and repetitious tasks, but without the proper guarding or adequate safety training for employees, these machines can cause injuries. Robot safety has long been a concern for OSHA, which first issued its Guidelines for Robotics Safety back in 1987. At that time, robots posed a danger not just when in operation but during programming, testing and inspection periods.

Workplace safety violations put employees at risk

North Carolina workers may face an array of safety hazards on the job, including those that can lead to severe injuries or serious workplace accidents. At the 2018 National Safety Council Congress, a deputy director of the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration highlighted a top 10 list of the leading violations issued by the agency against employers in the past year. The statistics covered the period from October 2017 through the end of September 2018, and in many cases, they revealed similar patterns of safety problems to prior years.

OSHA's area offices to enforce trench and excavation safety

Between 2011 and 2016, OSHA recorded 130 fatalities during trenching and excavation operations. Nearly half of those deaths occurred between 2015 and 2016 alone. This has prompted OSHA to revise the National Emphasis Program regarding trenching and excavation so that safety standards for this field can be enforced better. North Carolina residents who work in construction will want to know what the revisions entail.

Using past data to protect workers

OSHA generally considers events that result in worker injuries or illnesses to be "incidents" as opposed to accidents. This is because many injuries or illnesses to North Carolina workers or others are predictable even if they aren't expected. Employers who keep good records of how workers were injured or got sick in the past may be able to use that information to keep them safe in the future.